Posts filed under ‘Sustainability’

Lessons In Social Media Etiquette & Graces

speaker check in

Imagine this. You have created a hot new social network that promises to give Facebook a run for their money, or at least serve as a model for them to steal ideas from. You get invited to speak to an awesome group of cool movers and shakers in Portland – and when you show up, assuming you still lug around thousands of pounds of steel you when you transport yourself from A to B, you find an open parking spot right next to venue. “SWEET!” you say, as you head inside to tear it up and yack about your new technology thingamajig.

And when you enter the room, there are already panelists deep in conversation about Twitter and Facebook, and you think “awesome, I can’t wait to rock that conversation!”, only to find out that you were supposed to arrive an hour ago to speak on that VERY panel.

Welcome to my day today.

Since Bright Neighbor launched in November, I get to speak on a number of panels. At Portland’s awesome SHOP Symposium 09, I was coming prepared to talk about social media influence on real communities, and had several points to make about how Facebook is the presently king, how Twitter is irritating but necessary, and how Bright Neighbor is applied sustainability for growing local economies. I was prepared to tell five secrets of social:

1) You are what you publish online, and what you do offline

2) People like to keep in touch with the person who is always throwing cool events

3) Be fun, informed, and natural

4) Be open to making new friends

5) Help other people. That means helping the environment while doing good business.

Now, after somehow putting on my calendar that the panel I was supposed to be on started at 4pm when on the itinerary it CLEARLY states 3:15, I completely blew it and I owe Ericka Dickey an apology. And so of course like any lecturer who seizes an opportunity, I will use a variety of social media platforms to project project an experience that has revealed lessons to be learned from screwing up a talk about using a variety of social media platforms.

LESSON 1: No Matter What Your Reason For Your Screw Up, You Still Look Stupid
Everyone screws up, but what about when it’s you who flubbed things up? You can have a nice, shiny excuse, but when your malfunction affects other people, reality reigns, and you don’t do yourself any favors by not being the best you can be.

LESSON 2: For Every Screw Up, Multiply it by the Number of People You Know You Missed
Today, I could have made a connection with a business reporter, a hot blogger, a small business owner, a community organizer, and other event promoters. The room was full of potential contacts and people to make great things happen. So when you place your head in the hood of the car and start banging it into your head, make sure to do it enough until you learn to verify your calendar

LESSON 3: Make Sure You Make Up For It By Working Harder At Social Media and Real World Events
We could all be depressed about the economy and how any screw up can bring us closer to financial ruin. Everyone needs money to survive in the manner that we are used to. Grocery stores, unlimited gasoline, comfortable temperate home climates, and whiz-bang appliances and consumer electronics. Which is why when you blow it, you had better say you are sorry and get back to work doing what you do, and that means working your network and making things happen that need to happen.

LESSON 4: Triple Check Your Calendar
It’s only four words, but oh-so necessary to heed.

BONUS: Twitter joke

April 6, 2009 at 5:26 pm Leave a comment

A Comparison of Online Garden Planners

what-you-produce

The online micro-farm management race is on!

As more and more people are beginning to use their land as micro-farms, we believe the best of the best in gardening technology is yet to come. From using flash cards to learn companion planting, to the amazing drag-and-drop gardening technology now online, America’s micro-farming revolution is under way!

GrowVeg.com
Grow Veg
GrowVeg was the first comprehensive garden planning tool I found online. It’s fun drag-and-drop capabilities make garden planning as easy as it gets, with built-in teaching mechanisms for helping people learn as they garden and farm. With a free 30-day trial, it’s a super safe choice and a great tool for getting the job done.

PlanGarden.com
plangarden
Plangarden is a powerful contender on the scene with drag-and-drop toolbars, seed-centric pull-down menus, and a “shared garden” mapping system. Plangarden helps micro-farmers and gardeners think through their decisions and track their progress. This garden planner offers a free 45-day trial.

As more people get tired of “content-only” websites, they are looking beyond gardening advice for actual tools to accomplish their farming goals. Over time, we will see more online planners like this merge with social media sites through affiliate marketing. Community organizers and cooperative gardening efforts will continue to use commerce sites to create fractured economies based on food and seeds as a staple in their exchanges.

This is already happening with Bright Neighbor. Our network of lawn farmers is growing as we coordinate projects and help people learn how to be micro-farmers as they trade/sell their produce through Bright Neighbor. I’m sure we will see many more exciting developments as the tech crowd focuses on utilities that help us deal with food source complexities and fix local supply chains.begin

March 22, 2009 at 4:30 pm 6 comments

Companion Planting Flash Cards

Knowing which plants like or dislike each other can make or break your micro-farm! These are hand-made companion planting flash cards. This set of eighteen flash cards will help any wanna-be farmer learn the facts of companion planting to achieve better garden results. Each deck is hand made right in Portland by yours truly.

Companion Planting Flash Cards

Pick up your own deck for just $8!

March 22, 2009 at 3:51 pm 1 comment

Everything You Need To Know To Be A Farmer In A City

image

As a micro-farmer, I know how hard it is for the average home owner to get started with converting property to be a productive, home-based ecosystem. As an urban farmer and technology executive, I came to the realization that we have enough communications programs and it really comes down to working with available city land to grow food. Our home was a typical “1950′s Beaver Cleaver” type home, and now it is a productive food oasis, with water systems and beautiful, living soil. With just $10 in seeds, you can create $650 worth of produce!

Since we don’t believe in chemical-based farming, our recommendations are all organic methods. There is no substitute for hands-on learning, however this is a fantastic list of ways you can quickly get started and learn how to be a farmer:

Organic Food Gardening Beginners Manual
87 Page Step-by-step Gardening Manual For Beginners To Learn How To Grow Their Own Healthy, Organic Food – Saving Money And Eating Chemical Free! Revised Edition Just Released.

Profiting From Home-Based Farming
R.h.s. Medal Winning Plantsman Reveals His Amazing Ways. Promote His Easy, Simple Ways Among Plant Lovers & Gardening Enthusiasts & Help Them Earn A Part Time Income Of $500-$1000/week.

Your Very Own Tree Farm
The Complete Guide To Starting Your Own Profitable Tree Farm.

The Container Garden Expert
Finally Have The Benefit Of Years Of Specialist Container Gardening Experience At Your Fingertips And All In The Comfort Of Your Own Home, With Minimum Stress, And Without You Wasting Your Hard Earned Cash On Methods And Products That Just Do Not Work.

Organic Vegetable Gardening
Organic Vegetable Gardening Ebook. Even A Novice Can Start An Organic Garden With This Simple Guide. Complete Step By Step Gardening Guide.

DIY Worm Farms
How To Build And Manage A Worm Farm To Suit The Average Family. Recycle Household Organic Waste Into Fertiliser For Your Garden And Help The Environment Too.

High-density Gardening
How To Design, Build, Set Up, Grow With And Maintain A High Density Garden To Provide You And Your Family With Fresh, Wholesome And Tasty Vegetables.

Home and Garden – Country and Rural Life
Gardening And Birds, Raising Chickens And Goats, Baking Bread… more

Cinder Block Gardening
Learn how to make a super productive garden using cinder blocks and other methods.

March 15, 2009 at 11:41 am 2 comments

Postcard From A Transition Movement Hot Zone

The following is a guest column written for The Oil Drum. Randy White is a municipal sustainability expert, was a member of Portland’s Peak Oil Task Force, and is the Founder of Bright Neighbor, LLC.

Greetings From Portland

It’s no secret that Portland is a pretty radical city. While mainstream America is still learning how to make the leap to full-time sustainability activities, Portland, Oregon is a major hot zone and leader in the human revolution. The intent of this article is to offer an opinion and insight into strategies, collaborations, and technologies that are occurring in our city to solidify life-supporting social constructs.

We All Have Our Problems
Portland is dependent on energy and money just like any other city. With over 500,000 people, we have the 23rd largest economy in the US at $88.6 billion dollars. We have crime, poverty, homelessness, and hard-working people who would love more time off to pursue more joys in life if only they didn’t have debts to pay.

The fact is, not enough people here have the skills, resources, or contribute to the system to say Portland can become a completely self-sufficient city. While science has determined the amount of calories and nutrition needed for human bodies to survive, only each individual can determine what is needed to satisfy each of our own living requirements. Right now, people around the world are searching within themselves to determine what this mother-of-all-market-corrections means in the context of their own life. In countries around the world, people are reflecting on survival, whether it means scrambling to meet basic needs such as food and shelter, or committing one’s life to helping others survive as we dismantle nuclear weapons.

Indeed, finance industries and governments continue to try and figure out how they can game the now collapsing currency market, and around the world thousands of loose-knit social movements and groups are acting together, radically altering the balance between commercial and non-commercial economies. Portlanders are trading sink repair for firewood, worm castings for books, and organizing into sustainability groups, meeting to discuss a multitude of survival strategies. The cool part is that it is in the most relaxed manner I could have imagined. You know something cool is happening when the art community gets involved. To see scholars, artists, chefs, teachers, farmers, faith leaders, bureaucrats and other various communities coming together to discuss survival in a civil manner is surreal. It is also the beauty of the Portland conversation, because empathy, understanding, and cooperation are now winning out over personal greed.

Let’s examine some of the conversations taking place, and how people are organizing to do what we can locally:

Food, Food, Food
Portlanders will practically strip naked and make love to the soil. Our city is full of a diverse ecosystem of people and cultures who love and worship local food, soil, and farmers. The cool thing to ask at parties is “So what do you grow”? Little kids wear shirts that say “I Love My Farmer”. They worship apples – and I’m not just talking about their phones and computers.

As mobile as the city is with its fantastic bus and rail system, we have no problem getting around to all the amazing restaurants that showcase seasonal, locally grown vegetables in their menus. Our chefs strive to use local ingredients, as long as the cost doesn’t put them out of business. Our citizens have one of the highest percentages of CSA subscriptions. The fact is, we love food. So when it comes to loud-mouthed know-it-alls, you can bet Portland likes to brag about it’s success with food.

Using a variety of technologies to list events, food experts are leading the conversation. If you know how to grow food, fix soil, and install edible landscaping, you are all the rage. Take a look at this quick video and you will see what the job of the future looks like.

Presently, Bright Neighbor offers a “Lawns to Gardens” service, helping match people to homeowners willing st share their lawns. We are connecting Gerding Edlen’s newest building CYAN/pdx to Portland land owners to help create more garden activity and boost our local local food system.

Our April 17th kickoff of the Bright Neighbor Community Revolution Tour will include boosting lawn farming production, water harvesting, and permaculture practices throughout the city.

Transportation
This one is real easy. Portlanders either walk, bike, drive, ride, or rail it to and from where they need to be. If you need to get there, you can get there cheap, you just have to consider whether you will be exposed to the elements and how much time it will take. But we know we will get there somehow.

When it comes to fuel supply solutions, some Portlanders have electric vehicles, and many are discovering that you can make ethanol from hundreds of non-food supply threatening feedstocks other than corn. As for ride-sharing, people are getting to know their neighbors to work on cooperative projects and partake in resource sharing. For instance, if you need a ride right now, you can just call up your friends or discover your neighbors via one of the many Internet technologies. You can always use the Internet and phone to find a ride and share resources. The question is which technologies to use will make it easiest for communities.

Fixing our local commerce system
One high-brow conversation among Portland communities is talk of fixing our money system and the restructuring of the economy based on a non-fiat based local currency. The challenge with this movement is an assumption that outstanding debts can or will be canceled or repaid using any new system. The beauty of this movement and conversation is that even if we don’t solve the new riddle right away, the conversation is fascinating and the beer is great. Even thinking about the idea of replacing the world’s current broken money system is exciting in and of itself. The questions being asked have to do with real value, the meaning of real wealth, and property rights. It is being talked about by all political parties, all religions, and all citizens.

We are asking:
Who grows my food?
Who supplies my fuel?
Are my water need secured?
What is worth more, a knife or a variety bag of seeds?
How does the community determine each person’s value?
How do we know who is trustworthy and who isn’t?
How long will dollars matter?
Am I capable of doing what it takes to survive?
What is my purpose if not to make money?

The conversation in Portland revolves around a common realization that our community is quickly developing an entirely new system of accepted social values, logistics, and supply chains. I will end this postcard from a transition hotzone with the opinion that emerging businesses are using a variety of technologies to bring new food supplies into pop-culture at maximum velocity. More of our citizens are contributing real value to the community through hyper-involvement at the neighborhood level, and Portland will continue to lead the way in defining modern community survival trends.

What’s cool that is going on in your city?

March 3, 2009 at 5:15 pm 1 comment

A Good Food Farmer

February 16, 2009 at 2:24 pm 2 comments

Establishing A Food Forest

February 16, 2009 at 2:16 pm Leave a comment

How To Profit From America’s New Shopping List

Barack Obama Shopping List

Hey America, if you are paying attention, you can make a lot of money right now!

President Obama just told us his shopping list for his three year plan (funny, it takes three years for fruit trees to produce). Obama is about to get a check for $825,000,000,000 dollars and he wants to buy all sorts of cool new things for America, such as:

10,000 school renovations – Great for all the folks who can help kids learn about chickens and growing vegetables and neat stuff like that

Improved local community communications networks – Hey, I sell those things!

75% of Federal building to be more energy efficient – You mean like ride sharing? Light bulbs? Turning computers off?

2.5 Million weatherized homes – Wow, whoever makes bricks and insulation from waste plastic bags & stuff will make a killing!

Double America’s renewable energy – Woo hoo! I sell hooch making machines! I’m gonna be rich!

Anyway, I am writing about this because the secret is, and always will be, to be a master of markets for things people really need. That means neighborhood collectives can team up and go legally harvest firewood and split it up among the community, where people volunteer their labor in exchange for good and services they need.

Money, as we know it, is just a means of representing value. What has real value to you? Probably the same things that have value to everyone else: Food, shelter, transportation, water, electricity, friends, resilient neighborhoods and communities, skills and stuff the community can use.

That’s the power behind Bright Neighbor. We offer a machine that helps fix community economies and ecology. Think about it this way…

Chickens are egg machines.
Gardens are fruit and vegetable machines.
Trees are fruit and nut machines.
Worms and mushrooms are soil fixing machines.

Bright Neighbor is a communications system, a carbon reduction machine, a money saving machine, and a community repair machine all-in-one. We have implemented it in governments, businesses, faith communities, private corporations, and with individual community organizers who want to fix their community. Our customer base now ranges in all of these markets, and if President Obama wants to buy any of these things, Bright Neighbor is one of America’s post-petroleum startups now open for business.

Three cheers for the Three Year Plan! I hope you make oodles of money.

- Randy White

PS: If you are interested in setting up a Bright Neighbor community communications system, please fill out this form.

January 24, 2009 at 3:36 pm Leave a comment

David Blume Presentation in Portland, Oregon

This video is from when I brought David Blume to Portland before his book was published a couple years ago. Man, this dude has the total plan that can get us out of this Peak Oil and ecological destruction mess we are in.

Remember, we have to not only help secure food supplies, but also stop mankind’s madness. Three cheers for missions with purpose!

November 19, 2008 at 9:32 pm 3 comments

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